11/12/2009

v i b u r n u m * t i n u s

First of all, thank you so much for your warm welcome and for such an enthusiasm ! I was very pleased with the results given with Ginkgo biloba, but don't know yet what I will use the fabrics & silk yarn for.

This time I tried dyeing with the fruits of a shrub growing in our Mediterranean region, which makes white flowers in early spring, and then metallic (sincerely, it was really very pretty & I could have looked at them for hours) dark blue drupes in the autumn. You may know it by the name of laurestine.

v i b u r n u m * t i n u s

Isn't that shrub really beautiful ?

Spelling

Having fun with the drupes ...

Mordating with alum

Preparing the dye with the fruits

The dye itself (well a bit of it to show you the color !)

Fabrics & fibers in the dye

The result

As you can see, the colors are not the same on the linen (far left) and on the silk bourette & silk yarn. The linen got kind of light taupe, and the silks turned into a lovely green hue ... um, kind of light grey-olive green. (if you have a better name, please share !!)

As I've been on a roll this week, I'll make another dye tomorrow (with the helping hand of my hubby) & I'll share the result this weekend, as we shall stay at home.

6 comments:

  1. photography is fabulous ! i am enjoying following this natural dyeing & look forward to seeing what you come up with next !

    ReplyDelete
  2. I am loving this new venture Sonia and am so excited you are sharing your process here. The colors achieved by dyeing with plants have so much depth and warmth, even when they turn out different than expected or hoped.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I agree the photographs of your process are amazing.
    Maybe you should produce your experiments in the form of a little zine or a hand printed booklet. The colors here remind me of what happened when I used sumac fruits.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I agree with all of the above. What fun you're having and I love getting to see your results. It's as fun as visiting Margie's crochet in the woods to see what's developed.

    ReplyDelete
  5. wonderful and please do keep experimenting and documenting!

    ReplyDelete
  6. How interesting that those bright blue berries would produce such subtle olive and taupe colors. But I guess that makes the experimenting even more interesting; you can never be quite sure what you're going to get. :)

    ReplyDelete

Thank you very much for taking time to leave a word or two, I would love to know what you think ! :)