30 August 2010

f o e n i c u l u m * v u l g a r e

hubby & I spent the day togther, just the two of us, on Saturday. We explored an (natural) area where we had already been, back in June, with the kids, at that time. We were looking for something to dye with, but it was not the season anymore for the Italian buckthorn & the immortelle flowers we had picked back then. I had the sudden idea of picking something else that was growing abondantly here, and that is not endangered at all, and not dangerous neither. Fennel. Wild fennel, of course. Also know as foeniculum vulgare. I love this plant, fresh or dry, in the spring, summer, autumn or winter.

Foeniculum vulgare

Dry fennel

fennel

Fennel

cherry tomatoes & wild fennel

so we grabbed a bunch. Not that much, in fact. We wanted to try before making more eventually. We made the (hot) dyebath the same day, on Saturday.

foeniculum vulgare (wild fennel) dye bath

And on Sunday afternoon, we mordanted fabrics (the usual) with alum, and finished the process. It stayed overnight in the bath, and I rinced this morning & put it to dry. Now it's ready to show.

dyeing with foeniculum vulgare // results

dyeing with foeniculum vulgare // results

dyeing with foeniculum vulgare // results

dyeing with foeniculum vulgare // results

dyeing with foeniculum vulgare // results

I am very happy with the results, and also satisfied with my first feeling that it would dye nicely.

6 comments:

  1. I am so happy to see this, what beautiful work.

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  2. Lovely colour! I'm not sure whether wild fennel grows up here in scandinavia, I'll have to find out about that.
    This project of yours is great - I've been planning to so something similar for a while (local danish natural dye exploring) - it seems like a good method to record in photographic form and blog about it, rather than the usual notes and scraps og yarn/fabric all over the house ;)

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  3. This is gorgeous. Just gorgeous. I think we have something similar here. I don't believe it's fennel but perhaps something related. I might have to go gathering and try dyeing with it.

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  4. What a lovely green colour! Did you use the whole stem or just the flower?

    It would be very interesting if you could write a post where you describe the different types of mordant you use, and the various procedures for dyeing.

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  5. I've just visited your blog after finding it on google (looking for fennel dye.) I am interested in natural dyes and love what I have seen on your blog so far. Your photography is fantastic! I will add you too my list of blogs to keep an eye on!

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  6. Your photographs and work is so very beautiful-thank you very much for sharing it. I have added a link to your blog on my own today-best wishes and warm regards Kate :o)

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Thank you very much for taking time to leave a word or two, I would love to know what you think ! :)