5/16/2011

again three at once

We (hubby & I, as always) had dyed this past weekend & earlier this week. Now that it is ready to show, here the results. And like last time, here are results of 3 dyeings. And I love them three, I hope you will too. I modified two of them with iron, to darken the color. It will be a photo heavy post I must say. (once again) But since weekends are more & more quiet on the web, I thought I'd better share these with you today.
I'll go backward & will start with the last dyeing actually. We used rosa canina (wild rose), and picked rose hips last week during our day out.

the rosehips we picked

rosa canina (rosehips) dye bath

rosa canina

rosa canina

rosa canina

rosa canina

rosa canina

rosa canina

rosa canina

We did modified this one with iron. I like that it gave different taupe/brownish gray hues, depending on which fiber. On a side note, I had cut each and every rose hip with a pair of scissors, which had caused me a blister & to get stung by microscopic thorns. But that's ok ;-)

The second dyeing was made with geranium ropbertianum (herb robert). If you have a garden, there's a chance it's growing in it. You can easily miss it if you don't pay attention, but once you know what it is, its red stems will catch yours eyes always. It doesn't smell really nice when you pick it, but it fades when you dye with it. And I think, given that it grows rather abundantly, that it's a good source of dye. We did NOT modify this dye.

geranium robertianum

geranium robertianum dye bath

geranium robertianum

geranium robertianum

geranium robertianum

geranium robertianum

geranium robertianum

A slightly greenish gold, don't you think ? Really really interesting. We used the whole plant, sometimes roots included. Leaves, flowers, stems, and roots.

And the last dyeing, but not the least. We used rhamnus alaternus (Italian buckthorn) once again (we had used it twice in June 2010 & we had got a very bright yellow, and also a mustard yellow) This year, we modified it with iron, to see the difference. We were nicely surprised.


rhamnus alaternus dye bath

rhamnus alaternus

rhamnus alaternus

rhamnus alaternus

rhamnus alaternus

rhamnus alaternus

rhamnus alaternus

Luscious, right ? What I love is that it has a slightly "antique" look to it, though I hope I don't sound stupid saying this. Anyway, we are happy with this one too, and I hope we'll do it again, since this shrub grows abundantly in wild areas over here. And modified or not, it gives amazing results.

Okaaaay ... I think it'll be enough for one day, right ? I hope you enjoyed these as much as we enjoyed making them !

6 comments:

  1. What a wonderful resource you are putting together here. Herb Robert grows abundantly in my garden sot this is great news! So lovely to find your blog.

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  2. 'antique' was just the word I was looking for when looking at that last colour - gorgeous :-).

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  3. your blog is fantastic! i would like to start dyeing but I have no idea about measures... Can you recomend me any book ? and another question, can you wash these fabrics after diyeng them? I know I have no idea ;)

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  4. sonia, i admire your great patience with dyeing. you inspired me to try this myself.

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  5. What lovely, soft and subtle results! I love how your photos serve as a most elegant and effective dye notebook, using the same or similar types of fibers each dyeing.

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  6. Hi Sonia - your generosity in sharing your dyeing knowledge is much appreciated. I'm at a very early learning stage and every piece of information gleaned from lovely people like you is a treasure!

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Thank you very much for taking time to leave a word or two, I would love to know what you think ! :)